Learn About KnowledgeBase's Educational Materials Store - Or Start Shopping (Purchase Orders Are Welcome)!


Buy "Follow The Leader" (changED - Volume 2) - The Album / Mixtape!


Buy changED (Volume 1) - The Album / Mixtape!


Subscribe To Our Podcast Via iTunes | Android | RSS


Reach – Then Teach (Character Education Guide)

Character Education Crossword Puzzles (Volume 1)

Common Core Math
Word Problem Of The Day

Writing Your First Business Plan (Writing Project)


(All titles available at our Teachers Pay Teachers store - an online marketplace for educators!)

Sunday, October 28, 2012

The BIG Picture: Voter's Guide To Georgia (Charter School) Amendment 1



Remembering Georgia's (Charter School) Amendment 1 ...


October 28, 2012

 
About Derrick Brown


I am an analyst who develops and reports metrics that assess each Georgia school's academic, operational, and governance performance.

I am an agent of accountability, much like a big brother - but not like “Big Brother”.

From 2004-2010, I served as a founding faculty member, governing board representative, administrator, and consultant at a public charter school.




About The (Charter School) Constitutional Amendment

In November 2012, Georgia’s voters will decide whether to amend Georgia’s constitution to allow the state to authorize charter schools that have been denied by local school boards.

There are two opposing factions that have emerged, who hold mutually exclusive views (i.e., they see the same picture, but view it through similarly biased frames of reference) about the amendment’s impact …


Amendment Supporters Think It ...
Amendment Opposers Think It ...
1.       Creates a substantive appeals option for charter school petitions that are rejected by local school boards. 1.       Creates a redundant bureaucracy - because school petitions that are rejected by local school boards can already appeal directly to Georgia’s State Board of Education.
2.       Creates more public school options. 2.       Creates a parallel public school system run entirely by the State.
3.       Creates innovative teaching and learning methods, healthy competition, and shared best practices among public schools – which benefits Georgia’s students. 3.       Creates more profit opportunities for out-of-state school management companies.
4.       Creates a system of schools with the ultimate measure of accountability – if they do not perform, they are closed. 4.       Creates a system of schools with no true measures of accountability.

I offer a simple, sober message of hope and accountability to both factions …

1.    Understand the flaws of your position.

We have all believed in something – only to later find out that it was not quite what we thought it was …

(The) Boogeyman
Ex-Boyfriends & Girlfriends
Professional Wrestling
Santa Claus
(The) Tooth Fairy
Y2K

Spend ample time being forthcoming about your side’s shortcomings – including future unintended consequences, and other elements of the issue that you do not understand.

Inform your perceptions, challenge your assumptions, then help the undecided public understand the issues – so that they can make informed decisions.

2.    Sometimes "let go"; sometimes "let know".

The Bible contains a passage that almost seems to contradict itself – until closer examination …

Proverbs 26:4-5
New International Version (NIV)

4 Do not answer a fool according to his folly,
    or you yourself will be just like him.
5 Answer a fool according to his folly,
    or he will be wise in his own eyes.

In the jungle, those who become consumed with gnats and mosquitoes are often trampled by elephants. Pick your battles, and make sure you fight the right fight.

3.    Sometimes the cause masks the agenda.

Slavery was once a policy that opposing factions argued for and against with great passion.

Ditto for Prohibition, and denying the right to vote to people because of their skin color or gender.

Policies are created, challenged, and changed by self-interested humans who may be guided as much by ambition and myopia as they are by principles.

4.    Sometimes our causes mask our issues.

The media (which now includes the blogosphere) is littered with assumptions, perceptions, intentional manipulations, meaningless data, half-truths (also referred to as “true lies”), innuendo, and vitriol. Volumes of this content is produced and consumed daily by folks who love to argue.

In this fight, both sides justify both their passions and vices by stating that they are for children.

Folks who love to argue may not do so because of their passion – they may just love to argue.


Sincerely,

Derrick Brown
Email: derrick.s.brown@att.net

Thoughts on the (Charter School) Constitutional Amendment

About Derrick Brown



My passion is empowering people via methods that balance skill and will, analysis and synthesis, and ideas and execution.

I am currently the Director of Performance Management for the Georgia Charter Schools Association. In this role, I develop, implement, and report metrics that assess each member charter school's academic, operational, and governance performance.

I am an agent of accountability, much like a big brother - but not like Big Brother.

From 2004-2010, I served as a founding faculty member, governing board representative, administrator, and consultant at a public charter school.

Though I wore many hats, my primary role was always problem solving, and creating and refining plans and processes.

Prior to that, I helped to launch two successful startup ventures  – a for-profit Internet company, and a nonprofit educational publisher.

I am a registered mediator (sometimes referred to as a neutral) in Georgia. In this peacemaking role, I do not take sides, but I do inform perceptions, question assumptions, maintain a balance of power, and facilitate civil discourse between dissenters.

I am a mentor to several students. In this nurturing role, I do not make decisions or give directives, but I do help to identify options, and help to evaluate the consequences of choices.

I value divergent thinking (seeing multiple solutions to a problem), because it inspires creativity (the process of having original ideas), which adds value to society.

My educational, entrepreneurial, relational and academic experiences (I hold a master’s degree in electrical engineering from Georgia Tech) have endowed me with a diverse array of productive skills.

These experiences have also shaped my unique, sober, informed perspective on life, liberty, and the noble pursuit of peace and happiness. I do not think with my eyes, and do not mistake activity for achievement.

I succeed because I understand failure, and because I have exchanged the hubris of arrogance for the humility of ignorance. I know that I do not know, so I am always trying to learn.


About The Constitutional Amendment

In November 2012, Georgia’s voters will decide whether to amend Georgia’s constitution to allow the state to authorize charter schools that have been denied by local school boards.

There are two opposing factions that have emerged, who hold mutually exclusive views (i.e., they see the same picture, but view it through similarly biased frames of reference) about the amendment’s impact …


Amendment Supporters
Amendment Opposers
1.       Creates a substantive appeals option for school petitions that are rejected by local school boards. 1.       Creates a redundant bureaucracy - because school petitions that are rejected by local school boards can already appeal directly to Georgia’s State Board of Education.
2.       Creates more public school options. 2.       Creates a parallel school system run by the State.
3.       Creates innovative teaching and learning methods, healthy competition, and shared best practices among public schools – which benefits Georgia’s students. 3.       Creates more profit opportunities for out-of-state school management companies.
4.       Creates a system of schools with the ultimate measure of accountability – if they do not perform, they are closed. 4.       Creates a system of schools with no true measures of accountability.


I offer a simple, neutral  message of hope and accountability to both factions …

1.    Understand the flaws of your position.

We have all believed in something – only to later find out that it was not quite what we thought it was …

(The) Boogeyman
Ex-Boyfriends & Girlfriends
East Coast vs. West Coast Rap Feud
Game Shows
Professional Wrestling
Santa Claus
(The) Tooth Fairy
Web Van
Wonder Twin Powers
Y2K

Spend ample time being forthcoming about your side’s shortcomings – including future unintended consequences, and other elements of the issue that you do not understand.

Inform your perceptions, challenge your assumptions, then help the undecided public understand the issues – so that they can make informed decisions.

2.    Sometimes "let go"; sometimes "let know".

The Bible contains a passage that almost seems to contradict itself – until closer examination …

Proverbs 26:4-5
New International Version (NIV)

4 Do not answer a fool according to his folly,
    or you yourself will be just like him.
5 Answer a fool according to his folly,
    or he will be wise in his own eyes.

In the jungle, those who become consumed with gnats and mosquitoes are often trampled by elephants. Pick your battles, and make sure you fight the right fight.

3.    Sometimes the cause masks the agenda.

Slavery was once a policy that opposing factions argued for and against with great passion.

Ditto for Prohibition, and denying the right to vote to people because of their skin color or gender.

Policies are created, challenged, and changed by self-interested humans who may be guided as much by ambition and myopia as they are by principles.

4.    Sometimes our causes mask our issues.

The media (which now includes the blogosphere) is littered with assumptions, perceptions, intentional manipulations, meaningless data, half-truths (also referred to as “true lies”), innuendo, and vitriol. Volumes of this content is produced and consumed daily by folks who love to argue.

In this fight, both sides justify both their passions and vices by stating that they are for children.

Folks who love to argue may not do so because of their passion – they may just love to argue.


Sincerely,

Derrick Brown
Phone: 678-467-1256
Email: derrick.s.brown@att.net

Thursday, October 18, 2012

Accountable Accountability (Foxes and Chickens)


Accountable Accountability (Foxes and Chickens)

I am a performance analyst who develops and reports metrics that assess each Georgia school's academic, operational, and governance performance.

I am an agent of accountability, much like a big brother - but not like “Big Brother”.

From 2004-2010, I served as a founding faculty member, governing board representative, administrator, and consultant at a public charter school.

Our school was an equal mix of problems and promise.

The problems were caused by poor adult relationships, and inexperienced, unconscious governance.

The promise was the opportunity to produce creative, problem-solving scholars who had visions to create mission-driven enterprises that served the interests of humanity.

Our school’s problems overtook its promise, and it was closed. That hurt, but I have an unwavering respect for the principle that if enterprises do not perform well, then they should cease operations.

I walked away from the experience with a sobering awareness of the problems, and an even greater faith in the promise of charter schools. Charters provide opportunities to innovate, improve, and inspire that must be protected by the presence of accountable accountability.

Accountable accountability requires that all stakeholders answer to each other. Anything less will go the way of the fox guarding the chickens.

See, when the foxes are given the authority to hold the chickens accountable, it usually does not go well for the chickens.

If foxes police the chickens, then foxes must be policed as well. Ousting the fox and replacing him with a coyote mistakes activity for achievement. The chickens would clearly benefit from a more robust option.


Sincerely,


Derrick Brown
Email:
derrick.s.brown@att.net

Monday, October 15, 2012

Big Ideas About TEaCHING & Learning: Charting The Path To Success




Charting The Path To Success

Georgia's public charter schools follow a well-defined path to success - one that is paved by ...
 

Students
Teachers
Parents
Learning
Advocacy
Leadership

We share the video below to remind and to inspire all to stay on the path!



Please share your thoughts on these "Big Ideas" and best practices by leaving comments below. Email us or follow us on Twitter @dbrowndbrown to submit your own "Big Ideas" and best practices!
 
 
Copyright © 2012 Derrick  Brown. All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Big Ideas About TEaCHING & Learning: Talk To Me (CCGPS Edition) - Teach The Language Of Math!




"Talk To Me" (CCGPS Edition) - Teach The Language of Math!
 (Derrick Brown, Presenter)
(SEE BIO BELOW)


Presented During

Date and Time
Fri 10/19/2012 9:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Location
Rock Eagle 4-H Center
Oconee National Forest, 350 Rock Eagle Rd, Eatonton, Georgia 31024-6104

Cost
 FREE (To Conference Registrants)


Presentation Summary

Participants will learn to play the NEW CCGPS edition of "Talk To Me" -
a game show (in the tradition of Taboo and Pictionary) that requires teams of contestants to build language and discourse skills by guessing vocabulary terms from verbal and/or pictorial clues presented by a single teammate.

To learn more ...

  1. Buy "Talk To Me" (CCGPS Version) at TeachersPayTeachers.com (An Online Marketplace for Teachers)!
  2. Review Using "Talk To Me" To Teach The Language of Math! (FREE 24-page guide that introduces teachers to downloading and playing "Talk To Me" in their classrooms)
  3. Check out the video below to see how the game is played!



Derrick Brown's Bio

Derrick Brown is currently the Principal Consultant for KnowledgeBase - an educational publisher.

Mr. Brown has published a digital catalog of more than 70 short films, learning games, visual dictionaries, poems, essays, newsletters, inspirational posters, and projects. He has also delivered more than 30 presentations, workshops, keynote addresses, and invited lectures at conferences, high schools, colleges, universities, and churches.

From 2004-2010, he served as a founding faculty member, governing board representative, Director of Corporate Relations, Dean of Students, and Assistant Principal of Tech High (Charter) School in Atlanta GA.

Mr. Brown founded KnowledgeBase, Inc., in 1998, and served as its full-time executive director until 2004. KnowledgeBase's mission is to educate and to empower people by creating content that enhances their reading, writing, math, entrepreneurial, leadership, and critical thinking (problem solving) skills.

He earned his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering with honors from Clemson University in December 1991. He then worked for The MITRE Corporation's (Reston, VA) Signal Processing and Advanced Technology Department for one year before beginning graduate studies at Georgia Tech, where he received his M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in March 1994.

Please share your thoughts on these "Big Ideas" and best practices by leaving comments below. Email us or follow us on Twitter @dbrowndbrown to submit your own "Big Ideas" and best practices!

 
 
Copyright © 2012 Derrick  Brown. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2018 Derrick Brown and KnowledgeBase, Inc. All Rights Reserved.